Acadian Hairstreak, Satyrium acadica

Acadian Hairstreak

Satyrium acadica

Description:
The Acadian Hairstreak is slightly larger than Edward’s and Banded Hairstreaks. It is light gray underneath, with with a conspicuous submarginal row of orange on the hindwing below that continues over the blue tail spot. A postmedian row of round black spots is very conspicuous on the light background of both wings. The hind wings have obvious tails.

Habitat:
Wetland areas, especially marshes, with an abundance of willow, the host plant of this species.

Overwintering Strategy:   Eggs

Flight:   
One brood. It can be found from Late June through July.

Notes:   
The Acadian Hairstreak often perches on the tops of vegetation, usually near a good patch of willows, its host plant. This makes fresh, light gray Acadian Hairstreaks often easy to spot.

Overwintering Strategy

Two-way migration: Adult migrates from Wisconsin to Central Mexico
Small migration: Adult migrates from Wisconsin to southern US
Immigrant: Adult migrates into Wisconsin from warmer areas and don't fly south in winter
Adult Butterfly: Hibernates overwinter as an adult butterfly
Eggs: Eggs laid on stems, twigs or foot plants overwinter in diapause
Caterpillar: Caterpillars make nests on the base of plants and hibernate until spring
Chrysalis: Caterpillars shed their last skin, form a chrysalis and enter diapause.

For more information, read: Where Do Butterflies Go In Winter?

Further Information:   

 Design A Butterfly Garden
 Take The Butterfly Quiz
 Monarch Life Cycle
 Butterflies and Moths of North America
 WisconsinButterflies.org
 Southern Wisconsin Butterfly Assn (NABA)
 The Butterfly Site

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